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Author Topic : This is for the REAL cowboys
 Sage Brush Cattle Farms
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2/13/2014 10:20:34 PM reply with quote send message to Sage Brush Cattle Farms Object to Post   

Question... If my sister and I bought a real bull calf as soon as it's old enough to be sold, weaned or whatever, How much would it cost us to keep it just until it became a year old? Not counting pasture rental.
I know pricing may differ from state to state. We are in Washington State.
We could buy a bull calf pretty cheap from a dairy farm since they cant keep them.

If my sister and I can pay for a bull, including pasture rental, we can have one. After one year, we will butcher it for the meat, then start over again.

Thanks in advance.

Samantha & Hannah
 jh farming
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2/13/2014 10:38:37 PM reply with quote send message to jh farming Object to Post

Not sure a dairy bull would make a good choice of a bull to slaughter may be better to save the money to buy a beef calf
 Sage Brush Cattle Farms
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2/13/2014 11:50:41 PM reply with quote send message to Sage Brush Cattle Farms Object to Post

We just thought Dairy bull because they are cheap to get. Never thought it may not be good to butcher and eat. We will have to look online for meat calves for sale to see how much they run.

Cattle can eat grass from the pasture and hay during winter so it shouldn't cost much to feed. Or...am I wrong?

Pasture rental may be our biggest expense. We are thinking it will cost us more than the animal for a year.

I am hoping to find beef calves cheap enough for us to afford.

Calves should already have their vaccines before they are sold, Right?

 smammyc
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2/14/2014 2:16:17 AM reply with quote send message to smammyc Object to Post

I think you need to speak to your vet and local hay farmer about costs. You can buy grass fed beef for $2.50-$3.00/# on craigslist all day. Or you can buy halves. If you only plan to raise one the input costs wouldn't be worth the amount of meat.
 Owens Ranch
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2/14/2014 4:53:43 AM reply with quote send message to Owens Ranch Object to Post

You would have to think about the age you want them to be when you get them. Keeping a young dairy calf alive in cold weather can be challenging. I would advise getting something over 300 pounds at least.
It may not be worth the money to raise a calf over buying beef but the experience could be a lot of fun for you.
The easiest way to find out the cost of hay and pasture would be to look through local craigslist ads or look in farm classifieds for your area.
Another point I would make is that if you feed a dairy type animal grass only it may grow very slowly
 Sage Brush Cattle Farms
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2/14/2014 10:25:21 PM reply with quote send message to Sage Brush Cattle Farms Object to Post

My sister and I would like to thank everyone's input. It had us thinking deeper into cattle raising. Things were brought up here and in our inbox that we never thought of.
We decided that we could not afford to raise a cow. We looked into one acre field and found we will not be able to afford the monthly rent plus cattle grain, special grass and hay on a regular
basis. As the animal gets older, it will eat more and the vet check ups, ect.
We could kill and butcher a cow ourselves, which means hiring a butcher and renting a freezer locker. Again, more money.

We have a new outlook and more respect for those of you that raises real cattle.

As teenage girls, we will continue having fun spending money at the mall than at the Co-op.

Thanks again for all your help and input.

Samantha & Hannah



 Sowden Ranch
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2/15/2014 12:09:11 AM reply with quote send message to Sowden Ranch Object to Post

hi,
if you where able to find a orphan beef calf you could raise it for a bid just on some powdered milk and water mixed, and feed out of a bottle until its old enough to start on feed.
I walled recommend feeding it grain or hay (if you could afford it!)but grass will still do. its just at the end when you eat it the meat quality will be better and the fat and meat will spread evenly.

if you keep it for a year it will be around 450 to about 600 or so.

any questions I am willing to help you with. because I really do show cattle and feed steers then kill themhappy :)

Carmen
 Sowden Ranch
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2/15/2014 12:21:44 AM reply with quote send message to Sowden Ranch Object to Post

I would recommend beef, cattle dairy's usually are NOT for eating. and also get a steer.

you walled also probably enjoy raising a calf and getting him quiet after looking after it so you could walk up and pat it little calves put all there trust into you if you give them love and look after it so be kind to it.

before you eat it you have to worm it about a month before so it doesn't have any worms but if you do it like a week before you will poison the meat and you could get very sick. you can get it at a vet or a cattle place. don't really worry about any thing else maybe a bit of worming stuff at about 6 months old. you pour the treatment along there back from the shoulder back to the start of the tale head.

any worry's just ask me I will help you with your steer/bull anything.

carmen
 
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2/15/2014 2:35:15 AM reply with quote send message to Object to Post edit post

"before you eat it you have to worm it about a month before so it doesn't have any worms but if you do it like a week before you will poison the meat and you could get very sick. you can get it at a vet or a cattle place. don't really worry about any thing else maybe a bit of worming stuff at about 6 months old. you pour the treatment along there back from the shoulder back to the start of the tale head."

You don't worm an animal because you are close to butchering it. You worm an animal to avoid sickness, anemia, weight loss and sometimes death. A typical worm schedule is every 3 months, depending on the region, climate, pasture pressure, worm target, etc. Calves are more susceptible to worms than adults can be so need to be wormed more often. If you aren't set up to drench or give injections then you can use a pouron. Just don't expect to see very great results. Pourons have caused a lot of issues in regards to parasitic resistance. They're great for external parasites but aren't administered correctly very often and instead make the worms sick, giving them a wormer resistance.

www.iowabeefcenter.org/Beef%20Cattle%20Handbook/Internal_Parasites.pdf

www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/VY/VY-51.html

You are not poisoning meat by worming an animal. If dewormers were that potent, the cow would go into shock and die. The FDA monitors residue levels and has set withdrawl times for every shot, drench, pouron and vaccine. Just follow labels. Some of those wormers have a 14 day withdrawl, Ivomec is 48. If you're ever curious, call the local drug rep or vet.
 JumpingJ
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2/15/2014 7:25:58 AM reply with quote send message to JumpingJ Object to Post

It's amazing how many of you think that dairy steers are not for eating. What do you think they do with them, turn them loose like a wild horse?
 Owens Ranch
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2/15/2014 7:02:27 PM reply with quote send message to Owens Ranch Object to Post

I was going to say dairy steers don't necessarily taste all that much worse than beef but they typically are harder to get fat...when we had a couple hundred Holsteins on feed they were a little harder to keep alive than beef is the only major problem I've had with them.
 Maxey Black Hereford Farm
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2/16/2014 8:40:26 PM reply with quote send message to Maxey Black Hereford Farm Object to Post

yeah, there is nothing wrong with eating dairy steers. just a little less meat vs beef steers.

if I may recommend something I wouldn't rent land for just one steer, maybe rent like 5 or 10 acres and put 5 cows/steers whatever, or 4 heifers and 1 steer. eat ur steer this year and save ur heifers to have claves in the future. that imo would work best but I recommend beef cattle. u will have to pay more, but it will be well worth it in the end. you could also buy show heifers and show them as a 4-h project or ffa idk if you're still in school or not. I would also recommend talking to a farmer you know or are related too. they could help a lot, I know land around here is extremely hard to find to rent out because everyone jumps on it.
 White Cow Farm
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2/16/2014 8:59:28 PM reply with quote send message to White Cow Farm Object to Post

Nothing wrong with eating a dairy cow, most of them are eaten after they are not efficient milkers. The difference is most of them will be strictly ground up into burger, your not going to cut a bunch of steaks off of them. This is also what we do with old bulls after they are done breeding.

 Sowden Ranch
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2/21/2014 1:51:45 AM reply with quote send message to Sowden Ranch Object to Post

I recommended beef cause there better for eating and fattening and also pore on cause It would be lots easer for them to use on only a few head of cattle, not cause I don't know what on earth I am talking about. I do actually show cattle and have had a few big wins, and wins in hoof and hook competitions judge the steer alive and its end meet. sorry if people took it the wrong way its harder to explain on the computer then verbally.
 Bell Family Farms
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2/21/2014 4:51:17 PM reply with quote send message to Bell Family Farms Object to Post

Renting pasture for one calf would never be feasible. Find a Farmer and ask if you can implement a % cost for said animal (all expenses that animal costs the farmer you would pay).

Dairy cattle wouldn't bring you the best ROI but their hamburger is pretty tasty sometimes. Especially Jersey's from what I hear.

YOU WILL not make money on this endeavor. What Maxey said is mostly correct. You make money from the calves that you sell in the future. Even then; it's not much profit at all. Of course until you start getting show cattle happy :)
 LJL FEEDLOT
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2/26/2014 6:55:21 AM reply with quote send message to LJL FEEDLOT Object to Post

What I do is go too the sale barn buy 5 calves about 400 to 500 lbs. pasture them through the spring summer and fall and sell them at the sale barn. I have done alright doing this but you have to manage your pasture and supplement hay at times depending on weather. I own the pasture and make more doing this then renting it but I am set up to do it also. Although I do think it would be a very good learning experience. Feeders are approx. 1.70 to 2.00 a lb. right now depending on how nice they are. Sometimes you can buy 4or 5 hundred pounders cheaper than little calves sounds crazy but have seen it time and time again.

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